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Guiding parents and teachers to navigate the challenges of Anxiety

Anxiety is thought to be the most common mental health or neurodevelopmental condition worldwide. Even outside of a global pandemic and other stress-inducing aspects of societal upheaval, the pace and expectations of modern society seem to be causing a steady rise in symptoms of anxiety across the globe. Parents are worried, teachers are stressed, and their students are getting increasingly more anxious. Anxiety can significantly (cont'd below)

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Leading Articles about Managing Anxiety

Help Kids Learn from Mistakes

Natural Consequences Help Kids Learn from Mistakes

By Elaine Taylor-Klaus

This story falls into the category of how to support a teen without enabling – helping them learn from mistakes…

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reframe

Stop the Bickering – Stop, Freeze, Reframe!

By Diane Dempster

Shifting Your Perspective You ready to stop the bickering in your house? It’s all in how you look at it.…

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Help Your Anxious Child Manage Anxiety Instead of Avoiding It

By Liza Marks

Are you wondering how to help your child manage their anxiety so they can face their challenges instead of avoiding…

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Don’t Tell Your Kids to Say, “I’m Sorry”

By Elaine Taylor-Klaus

I’m Sorry, But… …This 4 minute NPR story about APOLOGIZING got my attention, and I believe it deserves yours –…

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Recovering Perfectionist

I’m a Recovering Perfectionist – Want to Join Me?

By Elaine Taylor-Klaus

Failure Fosters Growth As a perfectionist in recovery, there are no 12 steps in my program. It was developed while…

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using code words bubblegum

Using Code Words

By Elaine Taylor-Klaus

In our family, as long as I can recall, we’ve used code words to ease and improve communication.  When my…

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mother daughter worried watching new

Don’t Know What to Say to Kids about Civil Unrest and Tragic Events? Foster Critical Thinking

By Elaine Taylor-Klaus

My daughter called me on January 6, 2021, in the midst of the most profound civil unrest any US citizen…

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Relieve Mental Stress

3 Tricks to Relieve Mental Stress (Every Day)

By Elaine Taylor-Klaus

Stress seems to be a staple in our lives these days. Everywhere we turn, there are people rushing, there is…

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Help Them Figure It Out!

By Diane Dempster

My kids, 11 and 13, are practically twins developmentally. It leads to a lot of power struggles and conflict. This…

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(continued) impair a student’s availability to learning; its close companion, stress, can reduce the effectiveness of an adult’s communication. According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), nearly 1 in 3 of all adolescents ages 13 to 18 will experience an anxiety disorder; the Anxiety and Depression Association of America puts the number for adults at 1 in 5.

Many strategies are offered to help children, teens and adults manage the symptoms of anxiety, including: medications, stress management training, meditation and mindfulness practices, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), some forms of coaching, sleep hygiene, and breathing techniques. New and promising CBD research is revealing potential options for support in addition to commonly prescribed medications. As with ADHD and many other conditions impacting children, when parents receive behavior management training, they are better able to create an environment that can effectively support their children and teens with anxiety.

Symptoms of anxiety vary. On one end of the spectrum, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is reflected in more than 3% of the population who tend to feel anxious most days and struggle to remember when they felt relaxed. Social anxiety is another form of anxiety that occurs specifically in certain social dynamics.

On the other end of the spectrum, anxiety is a symptom of other mental health conditions such as panic disorders, post traumatic stress disorder, phobias, or obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Anxiety also commonly coexists in children and teens with other health and learning conditions such as ADHD, learning disabilities, autism and depression. Again, according to the NIH, between 2007 and 2012, anxiety disorders in children and teens went up 20%.